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NIH Prize Competition: Challenges in Single Cell Analysis

Posted: 8/26/2014
[From NIH website]

Prize Competition: Challenges in Single Cell Analysis

Notice Number: NOT-RM-14-014

Key Dates
Release Date:  August 19, 2014

Related Announcements... FULL STORY

 

OSPA Delegates Ability to Submit Annual Progress Reports

Posted: 8/26/2014
Attention PIs with NIH awards --  OSPA recently delegated to you the ability in eRA Commons to submit your annual progress reports, known as RPPRs, to NIH directly.   (NIH allows this delegation for SNAP awards only).  The SRAS staff remains available and more than willing to assist you with this process.  We are currently working on revising the RPPR SOP, which will be posted soon.  In the meantime,... FULL STORY
 

FDA Announces Public Workshop on Pediatric Clinical Investigator

Posted: 8/19/2014
Public Workshop – Pediatric Clinical Investigator Training The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public Workshop entitled “Pediatric Clinical Investigator Training.”   The purpose of this workshop is to provide investigators with training and expertise in designing and conducting clinical trials in pediatric patients that will lead to appropriate labeling. The training course is... FULL STORY
 

Yasuma Receives Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Research Award

Posted: 7/28/2014 - Tags: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Awards and Recognition, Research
Tetsuhiro Yasuma, postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been selected to receive the 2014 Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Award from Fight for Sight, a non-profit organization that promotes eye research by providing pilot funding to promising new researchers. Yasuma received training in biomedical research as an undergraduate student in Japan and general ophthalmology and surgery in graduate school. Yasuma joined the Ambati lab at UK in 2012. His research focuses on finding treatment for dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the form of AMD that affects the majority of AMD... FULL STORY

Sanders-Brown Research Presentation Garners Hirano Prize

Posted: 7/22/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Awards and Recognition
Dr. Peter T. Nelson of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) at the University of Kentucky, and David Fardo of UK's Department of Biostatistics, have been awarded the 2014 Asao Hirano Prize from the American Association of Neuropathologists (AANP) for the best paper presented on neurodegenerative diseases at its annual meeting in Portland, Oregon, last month. The team's research, titled "Hippocampal Sclerosis of Aging (HS-A): Connecting Genomics and Other Risk Factor Data," compared 363 persons with autopsy-proven HS-A to a control group of 2,303 other individuals in an attempt to identify genetic predisposition to HS-A in what's called a genome-wide association... FULL STORY

New UK Study Helps Scientists Understand Melanoma Development

Posted: 7/15/2014 - Tags: Markey Cancer Center, Research, Clinical, Melanoma
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers shows how a genetic defect in a specific hormonal pathway may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Fair-skinned people who tend to burn (rather than tan) from sun exposure have a much higher risk for melanoma than darker-skinned people. On the surface, it appears that the amount of melanin, the natural substance in the skin that determines pigment and acts as the skin's "natural sunscreen," would be the only determinant of melanoma risk. However, the truth is more complicated. Published in Molecular Cell, the study looked at the role of the melanocortin1 receptor... FULL STORY

Three Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Awarded Bright

Posted: 7/14/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Alzheimer's research
The Bright Focus Foundation has announced that three different researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have received Bright Focus grants for 2014. Professor Steve Estus and associate professors Harry LeVine and Paul Murphy were each recognized for their work on Alzheimer's disease. "Only 25 Bright Focus grants are awarded worldwide each year, so it's an achievement to get one. But three Bright Focus grants in a single year is truly exceptional," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK HealthCare's executive vice president of health affairs. "These awards are an appropriate reflection of Sanders-Brown's international reputation for... FULL STORY

Alzheimer's With Cerebrovascular Disease Compounds Cognitive Decline

Posted: 7/8/2014 - Tags: UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Research
Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have been able to confirm anecdotal information on patients with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) using mouse models in two different studies. The findings of these two studies, which were recently published in Acta Neuropathologica and Alzheimer's Research... FULL STORY

Guo Lab Reports Finding of Revolution Biomotors in Many Bacteria and

Posted: 6/30/2014 - Tags: Research, Biomedical
Scientists at the University of Kentucky, led by nano-biotechnologist Peixuan Guo, have made some critical discoveries over the past year into the operation of biomotors, the molecular machines used by viruses and bacteria in the packaging of DNA. Biomotors function similarly to mechanical motors but on a nano-scale. Last year, Guo's team reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. Rotation is the turning of an object around its own axle, as the Earth does every 24 hours. Revolution is the turning of an object around a second object, as the Earth does around the sun. Recently, Guo's... FULL STORY

UK-TLC Partnership Nurtures Promising Young Science Students

Posted: 6/25/2014 - Tags: Biomedical, Research, TLC
Not all learning experiences are created equally – and at the Learning Center at Linlee, an innovative partnership with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine allows young students to get rich, hands-on experience in the sciences and better their chances of succeeding in college and beyond. As part of the Fayette County Public School System, The Learning Center (TLC) is an alternative school for at-risk students who are facing personal challenges that might impede their ability to learn. These include socioeconomic factors, and, perhaps surprisingly, intellectual giftedness. Students may struggle inside a traditional classroom because the learning style or... FULL STORY

UK, Norton Expand Research and Educational Collaborations to Improve

Posted: 6/24/2014 - Tags: Research, Norton Healthcare
UK HealthCare and Norton Healthcare are building upon their history of collaboration to expand research and educational collaborations between the two institutions, with the goal of improving health and health care for all Kentuckians. Beginning July 1, educational and research initiatives between UK and Norton will be lead by Dr. Stephen Wyatt, who most recently served two successful terms as the founding dean of the University of Kentucky College of Public Health. Wyatt will return to the UK College of Medicine, with joint appointment as vice president for research at Norton Healthcare. During Wyatt's tenure as dean, the College of Public Health experienced... FULL STORY

Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Selected for Major Clinical Trial

Posted: 6/19/2014 - Tags: UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Research, Clinical Trials
The University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging is participating in a landmark multi-center clinical trial of an experimental drug that has the potential to prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). The A4 Study will recruit 1,000 participants ages 65-85 to test an amyloid antibody that may prevent memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid is a protein normally produced in the brain that can build up in older people, forming plaque deposits in the brain. Scientists believe this buildup of deposits may play a key role in the eventual development of Alzheimer's. Sanders-Brown is the only center in Kentucky and the only center within 200 miles of... FULL STORY

Cardiovascular Science Program Receives $1.2 Million

Posted: 6/18/2014 - Tags: Research, Gill Heart Institute, Grants and Funding
The National Institutes of Health has renewed a 5-year, $1.2 million grant to the University of Kentucky to help prepare clinical scholars for leadership positions in cardiovascular research. The UK Training Program for Clinical Scholars in Cardiovascular Science prepares clinical and postdoctoral fellows in medicine, nursing and pharmacy to assume leadership positions directing multidisciplinary research in the field of cardiovascular medicine. "The University of Kentucky has invested substantial resources to develop a highly collaborative training environment that leverages our strengths in cardiovascular science," said Dr. Leigh Ann Callahan, program co-... FULL STORY

UK Researchers Decode Activity of Starch Modifying Enzyme to Provide

Posted: 6/12/2014 - Tags: Research
Scientists at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine have gained a new understanding of an enzyme essential for breaking down plant starch, a process used in agriculture, manufacturing and biotechnology. Dr. Matthew Gentry and Dr. Craig Vander Kooi, associate professors of molecular and cellular biochemistry at the University of Kentucky, and graduate student David Meekins, have decoded the natural process plants use to break down starch. Their discovery will lead to more environmentally friendly and cost-efficient methods of processing starch, with significant applications for agriculture and biotechnology. Their findings were reported May 20 in the... FULL STORY

Advanced MRI Allows Researchers to Visualize Early Indicators of Heart

Posted: 6/10/2014 - Tags: Pediatrics, Research, obesity
Children who suffer from obesity carry a burden of premature death into adulthood. Obese children have more than double the risk of mortality in their 30s and 40s compared to children who begin life with a healthy body mass index (BMI). In addition to being more likely to remain obese as adults, obese children are at a higher risk of developing a number of health conditions, including stroke, diabetes, depression, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. Today, 30 percent of American children are overweight, 20 percent are considered obese and 5 percent are considered morbidly obese. Kentucky has one of the nation's highest rates of obesity. Because... FULL STORY
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