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Trustees Say UK Must Invest in Research to Address State's Most Pressing Needs

Posted: 10/20/2014

The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Saturday adopted a sweeping statement of principles, directing President Eli Capilouto to focus on the "most pressing" needs of Kentucky by determining how best to grow UK's research enterprise through strategic investments in facilities and talent.

"The challenges are overwhelming, but we can be up to the task of making a difference," Capilouto said. "These are not easy issues, but they must be our issues. The University of Kentucky represents the greatest hope in making progress against these issues, but it will take focus."

The resolution, adopted unanimously at the board's two-day annual retreat, directs Capilouto to take the steps necessary recognizing "the essential nature and value of all scholarly and creative activity" to:

· Align resource commitments to optimize efficiency and facilitate faculty, student and staff success;
· Recruiting and retaining additional world-class scholars and research teams;
· Strengthening the commitment to interdisciplinary exploration; and
· Confirming and detailing the critical need for additional research infrastructure.

"These principles reflect who we are as a people and as an institution," said Keith Gannon,... FULL STORY

 

NIH-Sponsored Webinar Offers Presentations from Five Experts

Posted: 10/14/2014
Please join us to view the following NIH-sponsored webinars in the Multi-purpose Room 27 of 138 Leader Avenue: Wednesday, November 5, Fellowship Awards Monday, November 10, Research Project Grants (R01s) The webinars will run from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., including a 30 minute Q&A period. Viewers will see presentations by Five CSR/NIH Experts The Review of Your NIH Grant Application Begins Here What You... FULL STORY
 

UK Researcher Awarded $100K Grant To Study Protein Associated with

Posted: 10/14/2014
The Alzheimer’s Association has awarded a $100,000 New Investigator Research Grant to Jose Abisambra, assistant professor at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA), to study a brain protein that becomes abnormally modified in the course of developing Alzheimer's disease. The New Investigator Research Grant program is part of the Alzheimer’s Association’s effort to increase... FULL STORY
Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Alzheimer's disease
 

UK Researcher Explores Gene's Role in Blood Clotting

Posted: 9/19/2014 - Tags: Research, Biochemistry, Von Willebrand Factor
Two independent groups of researchers led by Sidney "Wally" Whiteheart, PhD, at the University of Kentucky, and Dr. Charles Lowenstein, at the University of Rochester, have published important studies exploring the role that a gene called STXBP5 plays in the development of cardiovascular disease. According to Whiteheart, previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified a gene called STXBP5 as a factor that regulates a protein called Von Willebrand factor (VWF). VWF is an important contributor to normal blood clotting. When the endothelial cells that line a blood vessel are injured, VWF is released into the bloodstream, where it "collects" blood... FULL STORY

UK Study Identifies Molecule That Induces Cancer-killing Protein

Posted: 9/15/2014 - Tags: Research, Radiation Medicine
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers has identified a novel molecule named Arylquin 1 as a potent inducer of Par-4 secretion from normal cells. Par-4 is a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor, killing cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Normal cells secrete small amounts of Par-4 on their own, but this amount is not enough to kill cancer cells. Notably, if Par-4 secretion is suppressed, this leads to tumor growth. Published in "Nature Chemical Biology," the UK study utilized lab cultures and animal models to show that low levels of Arylquin 1 induced Par-4 secretion without causing harm to the producer cells. Additionally,... FULL STORY

Twitter Chat Offers Insight on Participating in Health Research

Posted: 9/15/2014 - Tags: Research, Clinical, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Barnstable Brown Kentucky Diabetes and Obesity Center
Did you know that you can help others by participating in research? Health-focused research affects every aspect of our lives, from the medications we take to the health of our environment. Researchers are working hard to identify new treatments and strategies to improve the health of our communities, but research needs healthy volunteers and volunteers with medical conditions in order to succeed. Participating in research is a safe, easy way for you to give back to your community and give hope for the future while learning more about your own health. Find out how you can participate in research during the University of Kentucky's next #AskACat Twitter chat,... FULL STORY

Meyer-van der Westhuyzen Study of Oxidized LDL Shows Early Promise For

Posted: 9/4/2014 - Tags: Lipid Research, Research, Saha Cardiovascular Research Center
A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions. Jason Meyer, a University of Kentucky M.D.-Ph.D. candidate, worked with Deneys van der Westhuyzen, a professor in the departments of Internal Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, to study the role oxidized LDL plays in the development of plaque inside artery walls. According to Meyer, the medical research community has traditionally believed that oxidized LDL plays a pivotal role in that process. "Oxidized LDL moves rapidly into arterial walls and engorges them... FULL STORY

MRI Used to Study Possible Therapies for Adult Congenital Heart Disease

Posted: 8/14/2014 - Tags: Research, Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiology
Studies show that adults who received corrective surgery for the most common serious form of congenital heart disease as infants are susceptible to heart failure in adulthood. Researchers at the University of Kentucky are using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to better understand the cause of heart failure in these patients, with the goal of eventually developing new therapies to reduce mortality. The team, led by University of Kentucky professor Dr. Brandon Fornwalt, recently published their findings in an article appearing in the European Heart Journal titled, "Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Suffer From Intra- and Inter-Ventricular Cardiac... FULL STORY

Following a Scientific Trail

Posted: 8/12/2014 - Tags: Research, Biochemistry
University of Kentucky associate professor Dr. Matthew Gentry, a biochemist who studies the very basic makeup of living things, can count very few "Eureka!" moments in his scientific career. One of those moments occurred while he was studying the genetic mutation associated with Lafora's disease, a type of epilepsy that inevitably causes death from neurodegeneration early in life. He was conducting post-doctoral research at University of California-San Diego to determine what happens within the cells of children born with Lafora's disease. He was examining the role of the protein laforin, the mutation that causes the disease. He and a colleague performed a series of... FULL STORY

Yasuma Receives Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Research Award

Posted: 7/28/2014 - Tags: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Awards and Recognition, Research
Tetsuhiro Yasuma, postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been selected to receive the 2014 Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Award from Fight for Sight, a non-profit organization that promotes eye research by providing pilot funding to promising new researchers. Yasuma received training in biomedical research as an undergraduate student in Japan and general ophthalmology and surgery in graduate school. Yasuma joined the Ambati lab at UK in 2012. His research focuses on finding treatment for dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the form of AMD that affects the majority of AMD... FULL STORY

Sanders-Brown Research Presentation Garners Hirano Prize

Posted: 7/22/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Awards and Recognition
Dr. Peter T. Nelson of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) at the University of Kentucky, and David Fardo of UK's Department of Biostatistics, have been awarded the 2014 Asao Hirano Prize from the American Association of Neuropathologists (AANP) for the best paper presented on neurodegenerative diseases at its annual meeting in Portland, Oregon, last month. The team's research, titled "Hippocampal Sclerosis of Aging (HS-A): Connecting Genomics and Other Risk Factor Data," compared 363 persons with autopsy-proven HS-A to a control group of 2,303 other individuals in an attempt to identify genetic predisposition to HS-A in what's called a genome-wide association... FULL STORY

New UK Study Helps Scientists Understand Melanoma Development

Posted: 7/15/2014 - Tags: Markey Cancer Center, Research, Clinical, Melanoma
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers shows how a genetic defect in a specific hormonal pathway may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Fair-skinned people who tend to burn (rather than tan) from sun exposure have a much higher risk for melanoma than darker-skinned people. On the surface, it appears that the amount of melanin, the natural substance in the skin that determines pigment and acts as the skin's "natural sunscreen," would be the only determinant of melanoma risk. However, the truth is more complicated. Published in Molecular Cell, the study looked at the role of the melanocortin1 receptor... FULL STORY

Three Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Awarded Bright

Posted: 7/14/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Alzheimer's research
The Bright Focus Foundation has announced that three different researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have received Bright Focus grants for 2014. Professor Steve Estus and associate professors Harry LeVine and Paul Murphy were each recognized for their work on Alzheimer's disease. "Only 25 Bright Focus grants are awarded worldwide each year, so it's an achievement to get one. But three Bright Focus grants in a single year is truly exceptional," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK HealthCare's executive vice president of health affairs. "These awards are an appropriate reflection of Sanders-Brown's international reputation for... FULL STORY

Alzheimer's With Cerebrovascular Disease Compounds Cognitive Decline

Posted: 7/8/2014 - Tags: UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Research
Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have been able to confirm anecdotal information on patients with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) using mouse models in two different studies. The findings of these two studies, which were recently published in Acta Neuropathologica and Alzheimer's Research... FULL STORY

Guo Lab Reports Finding of Revolution Biomotors in Many Bacteria and

Posted: 6/30/2014 - Tags: Research, Biomedical
Scientists at the University of Kentucky, led by nano-biotechnologist Peixuan Guo, have made some critical discoveries over the past year into the operation of biomotors, the molecular machines used by viruses and bacteria in the packaging of DNA. Biomotors function similarly to mechanical motors but on a nano-scale. Last year, Guo's team reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. Rotation is the turning of an object around its own axle, as the Earth does every 24 hours. Revolution is the turning of an object around a second object, as the Earth does around the sun. Recently, Guo's... FULL STORY
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