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Reminder Regarding NIH Resubmission of A1 as A0

Posted: 9/23/2014

NIH recently updated policies regarding application submissions.  That update allowed resubmission of an A1 application as an A0.  One of the restrictions outlined in the policy update states that the second A0 submission can not reference any previous reviews.  NIH is rejecting any application making reference to previous reviews.  To read more of the policy, click here.  For questions, contact your GPS.

 

NIH Provides Information on Systematic Application Compliance

Posted: 9/23/2014
[From NIH eSubmission Items of Interest - September 18, 2014] Systematic Application Compliance Checking – What It Is and What It’s Not  Automated enforcement of business rules by NIH eRA systems plays an important role in the application submission process – it helps you and it helps NIH. Understanding what that role covers can be the difference between your application moving forward to review and... FULL STORY
 

Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Accepting Proposals

Posted: 9/23/2014
In response to the third cycle of NCI Alliance activity, we are organizing a team to work on a proposal for  “ NCI Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence”. The UK proposal is entitled  “RNA Nanotechnology Center for Cancer Therapy".   Below is an attachment with a preliminary outline of the center structure.   We strongly encourage UK faculties to participate in this proposal.  Please contact any... FULL STORY
 

Meyer-van der Westhuyzen Study of Oxidized LDL Shows Early Promise For

Posted: 9/4/2014 - Tags: Lipid Research, Research, Saha Cardiovascular Research Center
A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions. Jason Meyer, a University of Kentucky M.D.-Ph.D. candidate, worked with Deneys van der Westhuyzen, a professor in the departments of Internal Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, to study the role oxidized LDL plays in the development of plaque inside artery walls. According to Meyer, the medical research community has traditionally believed that oxidized LDL plays a pivotal role in that process. "Oxidized LDL moves rapidly into arterial walls and engorges them... FULL STORY

MRI Used to Study Possible Therapies for Adult Congenital Heart Disease

Posted: 8/14/2014 - Tags: Research, Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiology
Studies show that adults who received corrective surgery for the most common serious form of congenital heart disease as infants are susceptible to heart failure in adulthood. Researchers at the University of Kentucky are using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to better understand the cause of heart failure in these patients, with the goal of eventually developing new therapies to reduce mortality. The team, led by University of Kentucky professor Dr. Brandon Fornwalt, recently published their findings in an article appearing in the European Heart Journal titled, "Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Suffer From Intra- and Inter-Ventricular Cardiac... FULL STORY

Research Investigates Another "Kentucky Ugly"

Posted: 8/13/2014 - Tags: Behavioral Science, Research
From the New York Times to visits from the director of the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, health disparities in Appalachia are receiving a lot of attention, and for good reason. The list is sadly familiar: life expectancy in the region is about five years lower than national averages; rates of cancer, cardiovascular disease, stroke, obesity, diabetes, and unintentional injury are among the very worst in the country; and myriad socioeconomic and geographic barriers limit access to health insurance and care. Former University of Kentucky President Lee Todd Jr. famously referred to these measures as the "Kentucky uglies." Kentucky has yet another "ugly,"... FULL STORY

Following a Scientific Trail

Posted: 8/12/2014 - Tags: Research, Biochemistry
University of Kentucky associate professor Dr. Matthew Gentry, a biochemist who studies the very basic makeup of living things, can count very few "Eureka!" moments in his scientific career. One of those moments occurred while he was studying the genetic mutation associated with Lafora's disease, a type of epilepsy that inevitably causes death from neurodegeneration early in life. He was conducting post-doctoral research at University of California-San Diego to determine what happens within the cells of children born with Lafora's disease. He was examining the role of the protein laforin, the mutation that causes the disease. He and a colleague performed a series of... FULL STORY

Yasuma Receives Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Research Award

Posted: 7/28/2014 - Tags: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Awards and Recognition, Research
Tetsuhiro Yasuma, postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been selected to receive the 2014 Fight for Sight Postdoctoral Award from Fight for Sight, a non-profit organization that promotes eye research by providing pilot funding to promising new researchers. Yasuma received training in biomedical research as an undergraduate student in Japan and general ophthalmology and surgery in graduate school. Yasuma joined the Ambati lab at UK in 2012. His research focuses on finding treatment for dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the form of AMD that affects the majority of AMD... FULL STORY

Sanders-Brown Research Presentation Garners Hirano Prize

Posted: 7/22/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Awards and Recognition
Dr. Peter T. Nelson of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) at the University of Kentucky, and David Fardo of UK's Department of Biostatistics, have been awarded the 2014 Asao Hirano Prize from the American Association of Neuropathologists (AANP) for the best paper presented on neurodegenerative diseases at its annual meeting in Portland, Oregon, last month. The team's research, titled "Hippocampal Sclerosis of Aging (HS-A): Connecting Genomics and Other Risk Factor Data," compared 363 persons with autopsy-proven HS-A to a control group of 2,303 other individuals in an attempt to identify genetic predisposition to HS-A in what's called a genome-wide association... FULL STORY

New UK Study Helps Scientists Understand Melanoma Development

Posted: 7/15/2014 - Tags: Markey Cancer Center, Research, Clinical, Melanoma
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers shows how a genetic defect in a specific hormonal pathway may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Fair-skinned people who tend to burn (rather than tan) from sun exposure have a much higher risk for melanoma than darker-skinned people. On the surface, it appears that the amount of melanin, the natural substance in the skin that determines pigment and acts as the skin's "natural sunscreen," would be the only determinant of melanoma risk. However, the truth is more complicated. Published in Molecular Cell, the study looked at the role of the melanocortin1 receptor... FULL STORY

Three Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Awarded Bright

Posted: 7/14/2014 - Tags: Research, UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Alzheimer's research
The Bright Focus Foundation has announced that three different researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have received Bright Focus grants for 2014. Professor Steve Estus and associate professors Harry LeVine and Paul Murphy were each recognized for their work on Alzheimer's disease. "Only 25 Bright Focus grants are awarded worldwide each year, so it's an achievement to get one. But three Bright Focus grants in a single year is truly exceptional," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK HealthCare's executive vice president of health affairs. "These awards are an appropriate reflection of Sanders-Brown's international reputation for... FULL STORY

Alzheimer's With Cerebrovascular Disease Compounds Cognitive Decline

Posted: 7/8/2014 - Tags: UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Research
Researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have been able to confirm anecdotal information on patients with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) using mouse models in two different studies. The findings of these two studies, which were recently published in Acta Neuropathologica and Alzheimer's Research... FULL STORY

Guo Lab Reports Finding of Revolution Biomotors in Many Bacteria and

Posted: 6/30/2014 - Tags: Research, Biomedical
Scientists at the University of Kentucky, led by nano-biotechnologist Peixuan Guo, have made some critical discoveries over the past year into the operation of biomotors, the molecular machines used by viruses and bacteria in the packaging of DNA. Biomotors function similarly to mechanical motors but on a nano-scale. Last year, Guo's team reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. Rotation is the turning of an object around its own axle, as the Earth does every 24 hours. Revolution is the turning of an object around a second object, as the Earth does around the sun. Recently, Guo's... FULL STORY

UK-TLC Partnership Nurtures Promising Young Science Students

Posted: 6/25/2014 - Tags: Biomedical, Research, TLC
Not all learning experiences are created equally – and at the Learning Center at Linlee, an innovative partnership with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine allows young students to get rich, hands-on experience in the sciences and better their chances of succeeding in college and beyond. As part of the Fayette County Public School System, The Learning Center (TLC) is an alternative school for at-risk students who are facing personal challenges that might impede their ability to learn. These include socioeconomic factors, and, perhaps surprisingly, intellectual giftedness. Students may struggle inside a traditional classroom because the learning style or... FULL STORY

UK, Norton Expand Research and Educational Collaborations to Improve

Posted: 6/24/2014 - Tags: Research, Norton Healthcare
UK HealthCare and Norton Healthcare are building upon their history of collaboration to expand research and educational collaborations between the two institutions, with the goal of improving health and health care for all Kentuckians. Beginning July 1, educational and research initiatives between UK and Norton will be lead by Dr. Stephen Wyatt, who most recently served two successful terms as the founding dean of the University of Kentucky College of Public Health. Wyatt will return to the UK College of Medicine, with joint appointment as vice president for research at Norton Healthcare. During Wyatt's tenure as dean, the College of Public Health experienced... FULL STORY
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